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Nate Bahler

Nate Bahler

Recent Posts

Soil pH - Humic vs Iron vs Lime

Posted by Nate Bahler on Jan 5, 2022 11:36:10 AM

It can be confusing when you see a bag of fertilizer with all sorts of numbers and letters and instructions on it, right? 

Many people are familiar with your typical NPK fertilizer macronutrients - Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium, but there are other common industry micronutrients and supplements that you might not be as familiar with.  

Humic acid or fulvic acid, iron and lime are 3 typical fertilizer add-ons that can take your lawn care program to the next level.  We'll break these three supplements down for you. 

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Slice Seeding vs Aeration & Seeding

Posted by Nate Bahler on Oct 14, 2021 11:19:35 AM

Here at Green Meadow we do a lot of Triple Core Aeration & Seeding and Dormant Seeding.  Sometimes, however, a different kind of seeding might be the best fit for a customer...that’s when we recommend Slice Seeding

How do we decide which service to go with?

Generally, if the lawn is 30% or more thick/dense/present we recommend Triple Core Aeration and Seed.  If your lawn is made up of less than 30% desirable grasses, we like to go with Slice Seeding.  For the best results with Slice Seeding, we core aerate first. 

While Slice Seeding often comes at a higher price tag than Aerate and Seeding, there's a reason for it and we’ll explain why. 

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Top 3 Signs Your Yard Has Chinch Bugs

Posted by Nate Bahler on Oct 5, 2021 2:58:56 PM

Chinch Bugs are a surface insect that thrive in dry weather. These small bugs can do a lot of damage in a short amount of time due to their high reproductive rate. Female Chinch Bugs will lay about 200 eggs!

They live in the thatch layer of a lawn. They feed on the crown of a grass plant - right where your grass meets the soil.  When they feed on grass, they release enzymes that continue to damage the plant even after they are done feasting. These bugs are tiny but can do a lot of damage! 

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The Disease Triangle [How to Prevent Lawn Disease]

Posted by Nate Bahler on Aug 27, 2021 2:35:27 PM

What is the disease triangle? 

The disease triangle in lawn care consists of the 3 factors (susceptible host, pathogen spores, environment) that are needed to be present for a lawn disease to exist. If one is missing, a lawn disease will not be present.  

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Phosphite vs Phosphate [Treating Pythium Blight]

Posted by Nate Bahler on Jul 29, 2021 9:58:45 AM

We have had a ton of rain in the Northeast this July and we are seeing a LOT of disease issues this year because of it.  

Pythium Blight is one in particular that we are seeing a lot of this summer. There are many different strategies for treating Pythium.  The one that we’d like to dive into a bit more today is using Phosphites. 

A lot of people when they hear Phosphite, think Phosphate.  These are not to be confused.  Phosphate fertilizers have become banned in lawn care use in CT.  Phosphorus is a naturally occurring and essential nutrient for plants but increased levels of these nutrients can jeopardize water quality in its run-off.

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Summer Annual Weeds

Posted by Nate Bahler on Jun 29, 2021 12:28:43 PM

Some customers ask us why they have weeds in the Summer if we have already treated their lawns for weeds in the Spring. Treating weeds is an ongoing process. Why? Because there are different generations of annual weeds. 

Summer annual weeds can be difficult to manage in the Northeast because they are suited to thrive in many of the same conditions that cool season grasses thrive in. 

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When Does Grass Seed Germinate?  [Air Temp Vs Soil Temp]

Posted by Nate Bahler on May 24, 2021 11:20:00 AM

Coming into Spring, soil temperature dictates just about everything we do in lawn care - especially in the Northeast where we have a lot of cool season grasses.  

What temperature does my soil need to be for seeds to germinate?

Spring seeding and dormant seedings won't germinate until soil temperatures are above 50 degrees Fahrenheit.  A range of 50-65 degrees is optimal (measured at a depth of 2 inches).  Once we reach this soil temperature, the process of germination will begin. 

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Annual Blue Grass (Poa Annua) vs Kentucky Blue Grass

Posted by Nate Bahler on Apr 29, 2021 11:36:01 AM

While these two sound similar, they couldn't be more different.  They are both types of bluegrass. One is desirable and one is not

Kentucky Blue Grass yields a beautiful, lush, dark green lawn while Poa Annua (annual blue grass) spreads rapidly and dies quickly, often leaving you with a patchy lawn. 

Fun fact: Many homeowners find Poa Annua undesirable but some golf courses find it very desirable.  It grows low and is easier to maintain in this environment.

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Hard Water vs Soft Water in Lawn Care

Posted by Nate Bahler on Jan 8, 2021 10:48:26 AM

How does hard water or soft water affect my soil/lawn performance?

Water that is too hard and water that is too soft can be equally damaging to a lawn. What’s the main difference between the two? Hard water contains minerals and soft water does not. 

With hard water comes nutrients that are beneficial to a lawn, whereas soft water contains no nutrients for your lawn - just salt. 

Rain water is soft. When it travels through the ground before reaching treatment facilities, it picks up minerals along the way in the process of becoming hard water.

 

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Spring Lawn Care Myths

Posted by Nate Bahler on Dec 23, 2020 5:00:44 PM
Myth #1 "The best time to seed my lawn is in Spring" 

A lot of people believe the best time of year to seed your lawn is in the spring.  Seed planted in springtime will germinate quickly but might die just as quickly as it came up. 

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